Anarres 2 cooperative community

May 23, 2014

Nevada City, Nevada

Filed under: Uncategorized — Ed @ 11:33 pm

Just finished reading a book about a group that tried to set up a socialist community just east of Fallon, Nevada. Called the Nevada Colony Corporation, it only lasted a few years, apparently due mostly to infighting and poor (possibly shady) management. It was expensive to join, and seems to have operated mostly as a ponzi scheme, with most of the community’s income coming from new member joining fees and installments from prospective members. It was in existence from May 1, 1916 to May 1, 1919.

“During the trying years of World War I, a series of coincidences combined with the persistent efforts of a few socialists led to the formation of the Nevada Cooperative Colony. The uneasy alliance between utopians, populists and Marxists quickly dissolved, but not before they had collided with Nevada’s patriotic instincts and the encompassing interests of the federal government. Nevertheless, for some two years the small Nevada community [was] a magnet which drew hundreds of persons anxious to express dissatisfaction with prevailing institutions.”

“Today, nearly all of the more than 550 residents who settled in the community have vanished, and the nearly 2,000 people who became members in absentia have destroyed their worthless stock certificates. The group of anti-war Germans who saw the colony as an escape from capitalistic militarism were among the first to become disillusioned; the scores of Oklahomans who threatened to turn [the] Lahonton Valley into a setting for “The Grapes of Wrath” have long since scattered. Indeed, it seems incredible that a sandy waste four miles east of Fallon could have, within a few action-packed months, attracted persons from thirty-three states… Cuba, Canada, England, Germany, Sweden, France, Hungary and Switzerland.”

“Retreat to Nevada,” by Wilbur S. Shepperson

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